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Latest News from McBay Mobile Opticians

Please visit regularly to read our latest news stories.

25 May 2018Dementia and Vision - Part 3

What causes sight loss with dementia? Because dementia typically affects our older members of society, there is an inherent link with typical aging changes of the eye such as cataract and acular degeneration. Other health conditions, such as stroke, can also play a part in siht loss.

But sometimes it is the dementia itself causing the problems. Damage to the brain can cause it to lose its ability to understand what the eyes are seeing - misinterpreting visual information. For example patterned curtains can look like a face.

There's a link below to some great information about sight loss and dementia.

To find out if you qualify for a visit from a home visiting optician call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

02 May 2018Dementia and Vision - Part 2

How do you know when a person with dementia has visual problems? Well, if communication is difficult, there are some clues to watch out for.

  • increasingly confused and disorientated
  • holding things up close
  • reporting seeing people or objects that aren't there
  • increased clumsiness or falls
  • being startled by people approaching

While these may all be due simply to the dementia itself it is important to rule out often easily remedied visual problems.

Regular eye tests are essential.

For more information or to find out if you qualify for a free NHS eye examination in your own home call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

18 April 2018Dementia and Vision - Part 1

The RNIB reckon that over 100,000 people with dementia have sight loss. So it is vital that regular eye examinations continue after a dementia diagnosis. I regularly have family members or carers ask me if I'll be able to carry out an eye test because of communication or behavioural difficulties. The answer is yes, absolutely. With some tailoring and refinement, everyone can - and should - have access to eye care.

A big advantage to my many clients with dementia is that I am a home visiting, or domiciliary, optometrist. I can examine their eyes in the comfort and familiarity of their own homes at a time that suits them.

For more information or to find out if you qualify for a visit from a home visiting optician call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

23 March 2018A cure for Macular Degeneration?

Macular Degeneration has been back in the news again this week. Doctors have successfully used stem cells to repair damaged tissue in the macula of a patient in the UK, restoring some vision. While this is exciting news, availability of this treatment to AMD sufferers is still many years away, and the focus for us still has to be on prevention.

To reduce your risk of developing this disease the best things to do are

  • Stop smoking
  • Boost Lutein and Zeaxanthin intake with lots of green veg
  • Make sure you're getting regular eye examinations

The Macular Society website is a great source of information about the disease and how to look after your eyes. www.macularsociety.org

For more information or to find out if you qualify for a visit from a home visiting optician call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

10 March 2018Who put the Lights Out?!

Everyone knows that you need light to read, and a good light at that. Natural daylight is our best light source and I’m sure I’m not alone when I take a food or medicine packet to a window to read the instructions.

But what is less well known is how the amount of light we need changes as our eyes get older. As our eyes change the lens absorbs more light before it can reach our retina, and our pupil diameter reduces therefore letting less light in in the first place.

Because I perform eye examinations in peoples homes, I can see exactly how much light is available. I carry a battery powered LED lamp with me to demonstrate how a good direct task light can help with reading. And my clients are always surprised by how much easier they can read compared to their normal up-lighter or table lamp.

For more information or to find out if you qualify for a visit from a home visiting optician call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

21 February 2018Healthy diet = Good vision

Vision is our primary sense. We look first, everything else comes second. So it goes without saying that our eyesight is important. And looking after our eyes should be a top priority.

One area that is often overlooked is nutrition - what we eat. Eating a healthy diet can help prevent a host of eye diseases, including macular degeneration, cataracts and dry eye syndromes. And making a few small changes to our regular diet can seriously reduce the risks to our vision.

So, what should we be eating? There are a few key food items that can make a big difference to the health of our eyes.

Greens. We need to start eating our greens, especially kale. Kale is packed full of vital nutrients called lutein and zeaxanthin that can help protect the macula. The macula is a small area at the back of our eyes that controls our central vision. Macular degeneration, where this area is damaged and not working properly, is the main cause of sight loss in the UK. All green vegetables have these nutrients, but kale has the most by far.

Carrots. Now, carrots might not miraculously help us see in the dark as we were all lead to believe as children, but they do contain Vitamin A and beta-carotene that help protect the surface of the eye and the macula. All the colourful fruits and vegetables can help here, so eat the rainbow, as they say!

Oily fish. This is a great food for our eyes, but you either love it or you hate it. If you can’t abide oily fish, consider a supplement of Omega 3 fish oil. This oil really helps with dry eye syndromes and it can help the macula too.

Nuts. Almonds, cashews, walnuts - whatever you fancy. Peferably not coated with honey or roasted with salt! Nuts have that Omega 3 as well. They also contain Vitamin E and zinc to help with our macula health.

See if you can squeeze all these into your diet this month.

From Glasgow to Greenock, Bearsden to Bishopton, Paisley to Partick - if you need an eye test at home call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

07 February 2018Did I mention Kale?

Can we reduce the risk of eye disease by eating certain foods? There’s plenty of evidence to suggest we can. One of the most important Vision Foods is kale. Now, when I was young, kale was what we fed cattle in the winter. But it’s now considered a superfood because it contains nutrients called lutein and zeaxanthin. These nutrients are really important for macular health - the area at the back of the eye that controls our central vision - and may help prevent or slow down macular degeneration. I add handfuls of kale to soups, stews and pasta sauces.

For more information or to find out if you qualify for a visit from a home visiting optician call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

27 January 2018"I'm too old to have my cataracts done"

A couple of times recently I’ve had a patient say to me, ‘Am I not too old for cataract surgery?’ There are a number of reasons why someone would be advised not to have cataract surgery, but age alone isn’t one of them. I looked it up, and the oldest person to have had their cataracts removed was a lady from Shanghai, China who was 109!

Cataracts can really impact your quality of life, no matter how old you are. Watching TV, reading, doing crosswords for example. Cataract also affects mobility, increasing your risk of falls and therefore being able to maintain your independence. The surgery itself is usually performed under local anaesthetic and requires you only to be able to lie flat for 30 minutes and then put some eye drops in for a few weeks afterwards. Yes, you have to go to the hospital, but you’re home again the same day. So, if you’ve been offered cataract surgery and are hesitating because you feel you’re too old, talk it through with your Optometrist.

For more information or to find out if you qualify for a visit from a home visiting optician call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

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