Facebook

Latest News from McBay Mobile Opticians

Please visit regularly to read our latest news stories.

21 February 2018Healthy diet = Good vision

Vision is our primary sense. We look first, everything else comes second. So it goes without saying that our eyesight is important. And looking after our eyes should be a top priority.

One area that is often overlooked is nutrition - what we eat. Eating a healthy diet can help prevent a host of eye diseases, including macular degeneration, cataracts and dry eye syndromes. And making a few small changes to our regular diet can seriously reduce the risks to our vision.

So, what should we be eating? There are a few key food items that can make a big difference to the health of our eyes.

Greens. We need to start eating our greens, especially kale. Kale is packed full of vital nutrients called lutein and zeaxanthin that can help protect the macula. The macula is a small area at the back of our eyes that controls our central vision. Macular degeneration, where this area is damaged and not working properly, is the main cause of sight loss in the UK. All green vegetables have these nutrients, but kale has the most by far.

Carrots. Now, carrots might not miraculously help us see in the dark as we were all lead to believe as children, but they do contain Vitamin A and beta-carotene that help protect the surface of the eye and the macula. All the colourful fruits and vegetables can help here, so eat the rainbow, as they say!

Oily fish. This is a great food for our eyes, but you either love it or you hate it. If you can’t abide oily fish, consider a supplement of Omega 3 fish oil. This oil really helps with dry eye syndromes and it can help the macula too.

Nuts. Almonds, cashews, walnuts - whatever you fancy. Peferably not coated with honey or roasted with salt! Nuts have that Omega 3 as well. They also contain Vitamin E and zinc to help with our macula health.

See if you can squeeze all these into your diet this month.

From Glasgow to Greenock, Bearsden to Bishopton, Paisley to Partick - if you need an eye test at home call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

07 February 2018Did I mention Kale?

Can we reduce the risk of eye disease by eating certain foods? There’s plenty of evidence to suggest we can. One of the most important Vision Foods is kale. Now, when I was young, kale was what we fed cattle in the winter. But it’s now considered a superfood because it contains nutrients called lutein and zeaxanthin. These nutrients are really important for macular health - the area at the back of the eye that controls our central vision - and may help prevent or slow down macular degeneration. I add handfuls of kale to soups, stews and pasta sauces.

For more information or to find out if you qualify for a visit from a home visiting optician call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

27 January 2018"I'm too old to have my cataracts done"

A couple of times recently I’ve had a patient say to me, ‘Am I not too old for cataract surgery?’ There are a number of reasons why someone would be advised not to have cataract surgery, but age alone isn’t one of them. I looked it up, and the oldest person to have had their cataracts removed was a lady from Shanghai, China who was 109!

Cataracts can really impact your quality of life, no matter how old you are. Watching TV, reading, doing crosswords for example. Cataract also affects mobility, increasing your risk of falls and therefore being able to maintain your independence. The surgery itself is usually performed under local anaesthetic and requires you only to be able to lie flat for 30 minutes and then put some eye drops in for a few weeks afterwards. Yes, you have to go to the hospital, but you’re home again the same day. So, if you’ve been offered cataract surgery and are hesitating because you feel you’re too old, talk it through with your Optometrist.

For more information or to find out if you qualify for a visit from a home visiting optician call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

20 January 2018Top Tips for using Eye Drops

Ever tried to put some eye drops in and ended up with a soaking wet face instead? You’re not alone! For some people locating their eye with the drops can seem like an impossible task. And failing to get eye drops in correctly can have serious consequences. If the drops are for Glaucoma, for instance, regularly missing your eye can even lead to sight loss.

On top of that, eye drop bottles are always tiny and by mastering your eye drops you’ll prevent frequent trips to the chemist.

Here are some simple tricks to learn which will result in you hitting the right spot every time. Follow this easy how-to guide.

Forget about the mirror in the bathroom. Instead, sit in a comfortable high backed chair or sofa and rest your head back. This will stop you swaying about and fix your eye in the one place.

Next, with one finger gently pull your lower lid down to expose more of your eyeball.

With the other hand, hold the bottle about an inch above your eye. Be very careful not to touch your eye with the bottle as this can contaminate the eye drops.

Squeeze the bottle until you feel a drop hit.

If you miss, don’t move! Just adjust the position of the bottle and try again. You can wipe up spills later.

Once the drop is in, close your eyes and count to 30 to let the drop get to work.

Gently blot any excess solution or tears without wiping at your eyes.

Simple! With practice this will get easier and easier.

For more information or to find out if you qualify for a visit from a home visiting optician call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

06 January 2018Happy New Year!

Wishing all my clients a happy and healthy 2018. I'm looking forward to another gratifying year with McBay Mobile Opticians, bringing eye care to those that can no longer access their high street opticians.

Best wishes to you all.

For more information or to find out if you qualify for a free NHS eye examination in your own home call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

01 December 2017Help! My eyes are dry.

With winter upon us, I find many of my home eye test clients complaining of dry eye symptoms. With the central heating on and the windows closed the air in our homes can dry out which increases the problem. Our eyes can feel gritty and irritated. They can become red and feel tired or even blurry. Often it feels like something is in your eye, what is called a ‘foreign body sensation’.

A strange, but common symptom of dry eye is watery eyes. This is because the dryness causes more and more tears to be produced which spill over and don’t fix the underlying problem.

So, what is dry eye? Our eyes need a good layer of tears to help them keep healthy, comfortable and clear. But our tears aren’t just salt water. They also have an oily layer to help prevent the tears evaporating and to provide lubrication. If there is an imbalance in these components then dry eyes can occur.

As many as 1/3rd of people in the UK have dry eye. Is it serious? Well, it can be. If untreated and severe it can cause inflammation and damage to the surface of the eye. But there’s a lot we can do to help. The most important thing to do is to get your eyes checked by your optometrist. If the problem is dry eye, treatment will depend on which component of your tears is missing or inadequate. The most common treatment is lubricating eye drops.

But, as with most things, prevention is better than cure and here are some simple lifestyle changes that can help with this.

  • Stop smoking and stay away from smoky atmospheres. This is a major cause of dry eye along with a host of other serious eye diseases such as macular degeneration and cataracts.
  • Air your home. Indoor living and central heating decrease humidity and exacerbate dry eye.
  • Eat oily fish. Salmon, mackerel, tuna, sardines all contain omega 3 which helps improve our tear films.
  • Lid hygiene. Our eyes are self cleaning and regular eye washes are not recommended. But we can keep our eyelids clean and producing enough oily lubricants by gently massaging closed eyes with a warm, clean flannel every day.

For more information or to find out if you qualify for a free NHS eye examination in your own home call 0141 611 9696.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

Ann

Principal Optometrist at McBay Mobile Opticians

29 November 2017McBay Mobile Opticians News

We've now set up a News facility on our site so that we can keep you informed better. Please visit regularly.